Call Now
(972) 279-1448

Other Invaders

Blister Beetles

Blister Beetles

Blister beetles vary by species in shape, size (3/8 to 1 inch long) and color (solid gray to black or with paler wing margins, metallic, yellowish striped or spotted). Most are long, cylindrical narrow-bodied beetles that have heads that are wider than the first thoracic segment (pronotum). The wing (elytra) covers are usually soft and pliable. Although over 100 species occur in Texas, common blister beetles include:, the black blister beetle; Epicauta pennsylvanica (De Geer), E. occidentalis (east and central Texas) and E. temexa (south Texas) are mostly orangish-yellow with three black stripes on each of the wing covers (elytra). A west Texas species, Cysteodemus armatus LeConte, has wing covers that are broadly oval and convex, colored black with bluish or purplish highlights.
Visit Site
Earwigs

Earwigs

Earwigs got their name from the myth that they crawl into sleeping people's ears and tunnel into their brains. The long cerci, or clippers, on their backsides easily identify an earwig.
Visit Site
Grasshoppers

Grasshoppers

Grasshoppers are occasional pests of ornamental landscapes. The differential grasshopper and four other species (red-legged, migratory, two-striped, and Packard grasshoppers) cause most of the damage seen by homeowners and urban residents in Texas. Because grasshoppers require relatively large breeding grounds in which to build large populations, most severe outbreaks occur near farmland and other less disturbed areas, such as in rural communities, farmsteads, and urban fringe areas. Although grasshopper damage is difficult to completely prevent during outbreak years, homeowners can minimize their impact through the use of barriers, insecticides and landscape plants that are less prone to damage.
Visit Site
House Crickets

House Crickets

House crickets get their common name from the fact that they often enter houses where they can survive indefinitely. Interestingly, they are known for their loud chirping which is caused by rubbing their front wings together to attract females.
Visit Site
Pillbugs

Pillbugs

This pest is the only crustacean that has become completely adapted to spending its life on land. Pillbugs have oval bodies and seven pairs of legs. They are easily recognized by their back, which is made up of seven hard individual plates. Pillbugs are sometimes referred to as rollie-pollies.
Visit Site
Silverfish

Silverfish

This insect gets its name from its silvery, metallic appearance and fish-like shape and movements. Silverfish have no wings, but are able to run very fast. They tend to hide their presence from humans which means any damage they have caused could go unnoticed as well.
Visit Site
Sow Bugs

Sow Bugs

Adults grow to about 3/8 inch long, have a number of rounded body segments and seven pairs of legs. Sowbugs possess a pair of tail-like structures on the back end of the body. Pillbugs do not have these structures and are capable of rolling into a tight ball when disturbed, a behavior that resulted in their common name, "roly-polies."
Visit Site